“That birds would sing and think it were not night” (In homage to William Shakespeare’s Birthday)

“That birds would sing and think it were not night” History tells of the birth and the death of Shakespeare on this day…. Perhaps the birds sang to rejoice in his first breath and sang again to mourn his last. A news reporter once interviewed Alan Cummings  on a morning  show. Cummings had been starring in an adaptation of Macbeth on Broadway. The newscaster asked Alan why actors still do plays in the “dead language of Shakespeare’s time.” Nobody understands what actors are saying, why don’t they just say it in English…….I think Alan was a little taken aback at his question…… Why do actors speak it, why do millions read it……… Because it is lilting, it is beautiful……it is the song of birds drifting on the breath of man’s voice. Yes, the birds must have sung the day he was born, and the day his pen lay silent…..

Birdsong is an enigma.   Most think birds sing when they are happy.  I have raised birds most of my life; birdsong is a song of loneliness for some, of possessiveness for others, of mating passions for all…..Loneliness, possessiveness, passion….sounds like the perfect plot to me, Will………

(the title quote is taken from Romeo and Juliet)

To read about my books, please visit my author page at Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Shirl-Knobloch/e/B00OEW2XJQ/ref=sr_tc_2_

Blessings,

Shirl

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About sknobloch

I am an Author, Artist, and Reiki Master and Intuitive Counselor, offering energy and guidance sessions on people and beloved pet companions. I divide my time between a Northern NJ suburb of Manhattan and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. I enjoy pursuing paranormal explorations in this uniquely haunted town. Read more about me at www.briarrosereiki.com and http://shirlknoblochwillowfineartprintsandphotography.zenfolio.com/ All writings and photos © Shirl Knobloch.......no unauthorized copying or use permitted without written permission from the author and photographer, Shirl Knobloch.
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